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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 91 (some duplicates have been removed)
with nyu, citigroup, and the white house. somebody should put a stop to this. president obama never did. now, first lady michelle obama says she loves movies. well, that's great. but why did she get the most important moment of the entire oscars ceremony? is there a hidden agenda here, something i may have missed? >>> i think the gop pledge to prevent a government shutdown is very bullish for stocks and the economy. the white house continued with its sequester scare tactics. take a listen again to homeland security secretary janet napolitano earlier today. >> i don't think we can maintain the same level of security at all places around the country with sequester as without sequester. >> all right, really? as i said earlier, her budget is going to be bigger this year than last year even with sequester. i've got to go to my pal steve mcmahon. >> don't you want to go to senator hutchison on this one? >> democrats are really going to lose this battle, and hurt her politically because the dire consequences will not happen. >> well, they won't happen maybe right away or maybe everywhere insta
it's in trouble again? david: dealing with the troubles with nyu, new york university. when he left citi, he went to new york university; correct? >> before citi. >> david: oh, okay. >> trying to figure out what did the guy do there for a fairly large paycheck. at nyu, it's a nonprofit academic institution paid over $800,000 -- david: $840,000, more than what the president of nyu was making. >> more than the president of most universities in the countty. david: what did he do for that money? >> well, he was the executive vice president for operations. he oversaw human resources, some of their construction projects. david: okay. >> similar to citi, wow, a big paycheck, bigger than the president of the university. why is someone in a tax exempt institution getting paid that much a year? david: good work if you can get it. liz? liz: fund manager likes apple, the top holding in the fund. the fund has done well and plans to stick with it. find out why, next. log on to facebook.com/afterthebell. do us a favor, click the "like" button and let us know if you think apple's best days are behi
to nyu and bachelor's in elementary ed. i could thread a projector with the best of them and my career in the 70's and in the last panel "if you had all the money what would you invest in?" . i would invest in education and we're not investing in the future of the children and the in the country and the global future of our world and i agree absolutely with everything you said. we're short changing our kids and not giving teachers the resources. there is mold in the teacher's work room. if i worked in the building that many children go to school in i wouldn't go to work either and in answer to your question there is a priority here about education that's not quite right. >> and while we're earmarking money i would totally support that and i feel that we should train teachers in digital media. you can't teach cooking out a kitchen, so we need to bring digital media into the classroom so people can practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quar
's healthwatch, doctors could soon know why kids with cancer get it again as adults. scientists at nyu discovered a specific genetic mutation that they say is linked to drug resistance and relapse of childhood leukemia. this discovery may help them identify which patients are more likely to suffer a relapse. >>> and a new study suggests, not all dairy products are equal at bone strength. a study found more than 2,000 people with milk and yo gurt are -- yogurt are associated with better density in the hip but not the spine. >>> with more and more patients in need of specialized care, doctors are turning to technology now to help them be in more than one place at one time. cbs news correspondent bigad shaban is in l.a., to what some are calling the best advances in medicine. >> dr. paul vaspa has an unusual way of making his rounds at ucla. >> how are you doing? >> good. how are you. >> he uses a robot. vespa uses a joy stick to control the robot's movements. >> i want you to do a couple of things for me. can you hold up your hands way up in the air
of depravity.com. >> right. >> what is the website? >> lawsofdepravity.com. >> and he studied at jowl jard- nyu. this is the full package here, ladies and gentlemen. and now, go to lawsofdepravity.com or amazon. >> yes. >> i think marcus books will carry it. go support our local black book store. >> absolutely. >> thank you very much, eric la salle. this is a pleasure. >> thank you. >> and dare i say scary and e illuminating at the same time. >> and intriguing. >> yes. >>> stay right there, we'll be back with more. . >>> welcome back. the last 15 years, 100 black women oakland chapter has been supporting and nurturing african-american women of all ages. here to tell us about their upcoming annual, madame c.j. walker, one of my favorite events. we welcome back cathy adams. hey, cathy. >> thank you. >> it's a pleasure to have you back here. you're always up to fabulous things, my dear. and looking fabulous, i might add. >> thank you. >> i like the black-and-white motif. >> thank you. >> tell us about madame c.j. walker. if there is someone out there that doesn't know who this woman was, enlighten
america's rising national debt&. nyu is one of 10 schools selected to compete in the inaugural up to us competition. the campaign sponsored by the peerer g. peterson foundation, the clinton global initiative university and net impact challenges students to engage the peers on how fiscal issues can impact the future. >> we think of it that it's not our problem. some of our online interviews, they said it's our problem. we're the ones that are growing into this debt and it's going to fall squarely on our shoulders 20 years down the road. so, the main issue is that students don't see it that way. >> on top of having full class leads, jobs, and personal lives, students are participating to raise awareness of america's debt. >> trying to get more people to know about our campaign and the federal debt. we're also going to hold two more events. one is a quiz bowl like a jeopardy event and the other one is a debate between college republicans and college democrats who are hoping to draw a lot of people to see how this problem is exacerbated in congress. >> reporter: in its pilot year, students
founded nyu, it was the largest private university in the united states. working collaboratively is a universal challenge. when i returned to public service in the administration, i worked alongside secretary clinton to promote the national security and economic policies around the globe and reinvigorate american leadership abroad. at the office of management and budget, i worked with democrats and republicans to ask the budget control act. it reduced federal discretion spending to historic levels. as white house chief of staff, i adhere to the principle that we work for the american people. we saw that principle in action. because of my experience, i approach the challenges that lie ahead with a clear understanding of their impacts the and significance. it does give me a profound respect and secretary geithner and others whose acknowledgments i'd knowledge today. when the president came into office, we have the worst economic crisis since the great depression. we need to reignite growth. our economy is in better shape today. over the past four years, the private sector has creat
director of the brennan center for justice at nyu. welcome. >> great to be with you. >> what's the strategy behind a more aggressive maybe antagonist kind of message that we might hear tomorrow night? >> well, one of the things is that it seems to be working. i think that his inaugural address, for example, was to me the best speech he's given as president. it didn't have some of the drabness and caution of some of his earlier speeches. it said something. and so, i think that if he keeps going with that approach of boldness and ambition it is not that everything he says is enacted in to law but he'll be able to make a case to the country and with some vivid colors and strong arguments. >> and the country wants to hear a lot about jobs which was relatively unmentioned in the inauguration. he mentioned jobs three times and not really in the context of job growth or creation. do you expect that to be a focal point tomorrow night? >> you are right one area he talked about in the inaugural was his theory of the role of government and didn't really wade in to the budget fights and the immediate t
to vitamin d which could affect your immune system. >>> scientists at nyu have discovered genetic mutations linked to the relapse of the most common childhood cancer. doctors say they may be better able to identify which patients are more likely to suffer the relapse because of the new finding. >>> a new study suggests not all dairy products are equally good when it comes to bone strength. the study looked at more than 3,000 people and found milk and yogurt are associated with higher bone mineral density in the hip but not in the spine. researchers also found cream may be linked to lower bone density overall. >> maybe it's a little better if you add the milk with some other dessert treats. super bowl fans watching new orleans for the big game, of course and also many enjoyed the world class food. but you always have to make room for dessert. >> it's friday. >> super bowl friday. fish fry friday. king cake friday. it's a lot of work. but i love it. i thrive on it. the adrenaline keeps me going. >> reporter: loretta harrison and her staff will all be going like energizer bunnies today. they'r
for sunday housecall. joining us as always this morning is dr. mark siegel at nyu and the author of the inner pulse, unlocking the secret code of sickness and health. >> jamie: and dr. david sa samai from the mount sinai medical center. we'll unlock a lot of stuff this morning. good morning. >> jamie: great to see both of you this morning. let's start right now because february is american heart month detd indicated to raising awareness about what turns out to be the number one killer of men and women in our
franco could get you into a college. he's always down there at n.y.u. pretending to go to class. i feel bad for you about this. >> it's okay. my daughter has said she would like for me to go to college with her. (audience reacts) >> dave: now there you go. >> and i'm sure that she won't change her mind. (laughter) >> dave: you know, my roommate, mom. but that's a lovely idea. >> it's a very lovely idea. >> dave: i'm broken hearted. i don't know why. i'm having a bad reaction here. (laughter) i want nothing but good things for you in life and you got some sort of -- it's like draw the donkey and you become an artist. i don't know. this -- (laughter) i mean, you can count and you know colors and stuff? (laughter) >> i have been struggling with some of her grammar home work recently. >> dave: hey, i understand you play the glockenspiel. that's me doing the word game on you. (laughter) you're a lovely woman, they should nominate you for academy awards every year. this movie is "oz, the great and powerful." this is a 3-d film. >> it is indeed. >> dave: we have a clip. michelle, what will thi
in the new york state supreme court, nyu, new york university is appointed state at the same time you're -- they invested in an aerial in the cayman islands open ended investment company created to be used for united states tax exempted investors. nonprofit sometimes seek to avoid paying taxes on unrelated is this income through offshore vehicles like funds in the cayman islands. while you are the executive, did nyu of investment in the cayman islands avoid taxes on unrelated business expenses? if so, how many did nyu invested in the caymans? >> when i was at nyu, was not aware of any policy to invest in a manner that you describe. i was involved in discussions about making sure that the endowment should have as good a return as possible. we wanted to have a diverse portfolio that would help the university get income. >> i will close with this conclusion since you are unaware of it. i take your word for it. it is certainly a poor reflection if you do not know about these investments. you're paid over $800,000 more than the president of nyu to know what was going on and i'm surprised y
from nyu. c-span: how old are your children? >> guest: i have a 20-year-old. we're becoming a real nyu family. he's a -- he's a junior there. he's going into his senior year. and i have a 12-year-old boy. c-span: how are you and your husband going about your next book? >> guest: well, we're deep in the middle of it now. he's in the philippines right now doing work. we're just dividing up the work in terms of the interviews. he's interviewing a lot of the men; i'm interviewing a lot of the widows and children of the men. i'll do a lot of the archival work, and he'll do a lot of the other work, other general library work. c-span: and what year is that coming out? >> guest: well, we hope it's--we hope to have a first draft done a year from december. c-span: the title, "we band of angels"? >> guest: it came from shakespeare. i spent a long time agonizing about that. it's from "henry v." there's a speech that the king gives prior to a battle that they're going into where he talks about, 'we band of brothers, we precious few.' and i thought it really captured this story, 'cause this is not t
is planning playing abig role in all this. joining us now, a professor at nyu, he is an expert on the russian mob. welcome back, good to see you again. >> good to be back. stuart: can you explain how the russian mob is involved? >> they're very good at working out how to use bureaucracies. they had 70 years back in the motherland, but these are sharp people, these are much more the new generation of cancer does this man. let's face it, when you have three quarters of a trillion dollars spent per year, that is a massive opportunity. stuart: what is the mechanism, the process? >> the set up operations in which a lot of billings go down. medical equipment never get signed off on this. you either have a big operation, one for example back in 2010 which involved over 100 corporations, they did $160 million, run by an armenian. and at the same time we have had big operations, $57 million, but the point is it was caught running the full operation, a quarter of a billion dollars on that one operation. stuart: if you know about this, why don't the authorities know about this? >> they do. stuart: why d
in seeking arrangement.com sugar lifestyle. georgia state, nyu, temple, arizona state, as well as georgia. plus more. the las vegas-based dating web site has a seen an explosion of young female college students matching up intentionally with rich older men their sugar daddies. it says, 80% of the time, the relationships do, in fact, involve sex. >> he spoils me a lot and i love it. [ laughter ] >> nina says clothing, books, a laptop, all supplied by her 62-year-old sponsor who is in it for six grand so far. she's a 20-year-old sophomore at florida international university and here is a typical date. >> he takes me to the movies and then after he puts me to the grill, and then after that he rents a hotel. so we stay there a couple of hours. he surprised me with flowers and candy and we kiss, cuddle. >> but at least one florida lawmakers calls this quid pro quo prostitution. he sent a letter to the state a.g. hoping to shut web site down, which the target calls an overreaction. >> just because the two are involved in a romantic relationship does not make the romantic relationship prostitut
would be a lot more challenging. >> i agree. if you travel the country i went to college at n.y.u. and at the catholic center gay couples were openly welcome. they send the liberal priests to the liberal areas and conservative priests to the conservative areas. a big part of the priest is to get people to open their pocketbooks and put money in the baskets. it is the business sense that has caused it to marginalize itself. i think if they could open themselves up to a whole new array of parishioners that want to give money to the church, getting baaing to the message of jesus and get over the hang ups about the dirty parts. >> i don't see that happening anymore than you having a pocketbook john. i'm sure you'll have more on viewpoint tonight. thanks so much, john. >> thank you epic politics man great to see you there. >> all right. coming up here on the war room, the state of the union the sport, the spectacle and the policy and performance. michael tomasky of newsweek daily beast will give us a taste of what we can expect from tomorrow night's big speech. >> we can be fairly cert
not familiar. >> let me move on. the case filed in the new york state supreme court in which nyu is the plaintiff states that at the same time you were executive vice president, new york university invested in the arial font, a cayman -- arerial fund, a cayman islands investment company. nonprofits sometimes seek to avoid paying taxes on unrelated business income through offshore vehicles like funds and the cayman islands. are you or the executive vice president -- when you were the executive vice president did nyu have invested -- investment in the cayman islands to avoid paying taxes on unrelated business expenses? >> when i was at nyu, i was not aware of any policy to invest in the manner you describe. i was in no discussions regardeing -- i was involved in discussions about making sure the endowment was invested to have as good a return as possible. the goal at nyu was to try to have a diverse part folio -- portfolio. >> i will close with this collusion, since you are unaware of it and i take you word -- i take your word for it. it is a poor reflection on your tenure if you
. professor at nyu and was also a visiting professor at beijing university. why would the chinese military or otherwise pick on "the new york times"? "the new york times" is only slight tloi tly to the right of. i think china is probably more capitalist that "the new york times" editorial page. so why did they go after the "times"? >> well, when they published the article, it really inflamed a lot of folks. and even though we allege it's the chinese military, we don't really know for sure because there are lots of chinese hackers in china. so it could very well be just rogue nationalist folks who decided to take matters into their own hands. you have to remember he is a very popular leader in china. so with the nationalist sentiment that's been growing in china, it's very possible other folks got involved too and it doesn't necessarily have to be states -- >> you may be right, but i just figure the military of the red army would be the enforcer. because his relatives became billionaires. isn't that some coincidental thing. i'm sure they're just brilliant businessmen. i just figured the chi
testimony from duke, harvard, and nyu professors. republican committee chair bob goodlot says the purpose of the hearing is to educate freshmen congressman who know very little about the complexities of reform. lesson number one is already clear. move past last year's republican rhetoric on self-deportation and electrified fences. >> this debate is often emotionally charged. that's because it's not about abstract statistics and concepts, but rather about real people with real problems trying to provide a better life for their families. >> we seek to harmonize two foundational preaccepts. number one is humanity. number two is respect for the rule of law. >> humane rhetoric? yes, but humane policies? question mark. republican leadership is transcribinging a decidedly softer tone on immigration, but the party will still have to contend with members like carrie who said, "what are you seeing here is a shameless political ploy to buy new voters. democrats want the votes, and republicans the cheap labor. immigration reform shouldn't be about buying off lawbreakers so they'll consider becoming r
children. a doctor from nyu was kind enough to jog down here to talk to us about this. let's be clear. i love tv. it's not just watching tv. it's the sitting around, right? >> absolutely. i do think this study is consistent with the study, if you have a sedentary lifestyle, it makes it tougher in terms of hormonal function, sperm making, all of those things, and those are closely related in a guy. this study was a couple hundred young men followed for three months. they are college age. they found if you are more sedentary, if you are more overweight you are less likely to have normal sperm count. it fits into the idea someone having trouble getting their wife pregnant, their girlfriend pregnant, their partner pregnant, you can tell them healthy lifestyle will help this problem. >> they took into account diet and sleep patterns and all these other factors that might kind of mess with the results. but those didn't mess with the results. >> with the exception of body mass index. so weight as relates to your height. that's right. so yes, i think the idea that somebody whose big but active i
for the "washington post," and bob shrum, professor of public policy at nyu and contributor to the daily beast. gentlemen, you're the two perfect guests for this subject. we've got to -- we don't have to unpack the republican party. we have to pack 'em into a box and see if they can sell this stuff again. eugene, is there any chance, or should i say is there really any change that there is going to be a change in substance of what the gop is trying to repackage to the american people? it sounds like a lot of the same stuff. >> well, ed, let me start by being as charitable as i can possibly be. the old proverb a journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. this is one very small step. it was a speech that had a lot of nice words. but you're absolutely right in that it said nothing about the policies that the republican party espouses and continues to espouse that are ejected by large majorities of the american people. you know, people get what the party stands for, and they don't like it. so it's a step, a little step, but it has to be followed up by the kind of action that i'm not sure er
waldman from nyu school of law, and michael medved, conservative commentator. great to see both of you. the president asking for a smaller package because a bigger deal can't get done. how is this moving the ball forward? there's blame to go on both sides here but it is pathetic. >> i think he probably would say that it's better to kick the can down the road than to kick the economy off the cliff. this is kind of a self-inflicted answer to a concocted crisis. the threat to default on the debt a few years ago to try to force a budget deal, and then oh, we're going to put these automatic cuts in, they're going to be so terrible that that will force our hand, and now the political market and everybody else is kind of priced in already the nonsense. so i think as an economic matter, it would be really bad to have this austerity go in effect right now but it's not a permanent solution, it's not a way to run a railroad or a government. >> you have a point. a lot of people agree with you. but let me ask about this. the president's 2013 budget was $3.8 trillion. the automatic spending cuts, se
. his father was a psychiatrist. he went to harvard college and then got a masters at nyu. he then became an investment banker doing mortgage finance at morgan stanley lehman brothers were headed frontmost seat to fannie and freddie, which something we might hear more from in the q&a. then he got involved in television and ceo of the game show network and came to help policy writing very late in life because it is tragic that affected his father. he wrote a cover story in the atlantic magazine. and turned that into a book. it's an incredibly compelling book which i encourage all of you to buy the there's copied outside and i'm also instructed to say that the next season of american bible challenge, the game show network highest-rated show, is coming on in a few weeks of the game show network can feel like we are not stealing its ceo from his ceo duties and we are giving them a plug, too. so please join in welcoming david gold hill. i'm sure we're going to a lot from him today. [applause] >> thank you, avik. i'm sure everyone in here regional blog but it's a thrill when, as an
. >> so you imagine the stock market -- we look at this at nyu where i teach. the stock market was 100 for a long time. then it went up 200, very high and coolidge saw a lot of recessions. that doubled. that is like our 90's. then it went to 381, that would be september 1929. coolidge didn't approve of that. he had seen a lot of recessions. everything in him knew that was wrong. he didn't believe it was the job of the chief executive to intervene. it was the order of the "wall street journal but he didn't think the president was in charge of that. the fed was also young. he looked into it. there is a record of him looking into it. charles merrill who founded merrill lynch and he went to see him and they talked about it and coolidge was terrified because he was so conservative and he knew what a crash was. but he didn't see it as a president's role and neither did merrill. that would be a state authority. another factor in that period was what fed policy was and we all know the great fed leader died. i do not blame this on coolidge in the least. and one of the important factors you alwa
university professor michael eric dyson and bob shrum, nyu professor of public policy and contributor to the daily beast. gentlemen, good to have you with us. >> thank you. >> bob, you first. what does president obama need to do between now and march 1? i mean, see going on the road right after the state of the union address. i mean, is power to the people going to be the answer to all of this? >> well, i think he's got to go out there. he's got to make that case constantly. he's got say he is fighting for the middle class, position the republicans so that they are actually held responsible for what happens to this economy. if you look at the polling, people think they're the problem. so tomorrow night he's got to lay the groundwork. he's got to keep pushing these issues. hopefully he can get something done, force these people to move. or alternatively, as i wrote last week, he is going to have to campaign in effect for a third term in 2014, try to defy history, and try to see if we can either take back the house or get close to taking back the house. >> michael, is the public aware o
and is now the director of nyu's brennan center for justice, and anita dunn, former white house communications director and former advisor to then senator obama. welcome to both. thank you very much. anita, first to you. have you talked to people in the white house. the president's focus is jobs and the economy and laying out some terms of the budget deal. you also have to sort of paint broad strokes. this isn't the inaugural address. this is when it gets specific. what is the real goal here? >> thank you for having me on. you know, the president has addressed a joint session of congress seven times in his presidency, and each time the underlying piece of this has always been about the economy and middle class families and how do we get this country moving again with an economy that helps middle class families, and that's the predicate. that's really the story of his presidency. the state of the union is the opportunity to speak to the entire country as well as congress and to really lay out what your priorities are, and i think the president uses these occasions very well becau
to harvard college and then got a masters at nyu. he then became an investment banker doing mortgage finance at morgan stanley lehman brothers where he had a front row seat to fannie and freddie, which is something we might hear more from him in the q&a. and he got involved in television and he is ceo of the game show network and came to policy writing relate in his life because of this tragedy that affected his life. eroded cover story in the atlantic magazine. and then turned that into a book, and it's an incredibly compelling book, which i encourage all of you to buy. there's copies outside the animals were instructed to say that the next season of the american bible challenge, the game show network highest rated show, is coming on in a few weeks. said the game show network and feel like we are not stealing its ceo from his ceo duties, and we're giving them a plug, too. so please join me in welcoming david goldhill. i'm sure we're going to learn a lot from him today. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sure everyone in your region or blog, but it's a thrill when, as an outsider non-expert, you'r
and a visiting professor at nyu, and cnbc's squawk box co-host, "new york times" columnist andrew ross sorkin. just ten days from now billions of dollars in automatic spending cuts are scheduled to kick in. with congress on recess until monday, lawmakers will have just five days to find a solution. an hour ago speaking in front of first responders who lose their jobs or see their hours drastically trimmed by the so-called sequester, president obama urged congress to avoid the cuts and specifically urged republicans in congress. >> republicans in congress face a simple choice. are they willing to compromise to protect vital investments in education and health care and national security and all the jobs that depend on them, or would they rather put hundreds of thousands of jobs and our entire economy at risk just to protect a few special interest tax loophole that is benefit only the healthiest americans and biggest corporations? that's the choice. >> while the cuts would put the gvt government on a path towards a debt reduction, they are inkrimtat or a lot like a meat clever. it would force th
. we have an economics professor at nyu and former director of the congressional budget office. at this point, are the cuts inevitable? why is the president still talking about it? >> well, we're ten days away and it seems like the republicans really don't want to do anything to fend off this crisis. you said sequester is an odd word. in a lot of languages, it means kidnap. it's sort of a kidnap situation because the economy is kidnapped, fearing that we might lose maybe .6 of a percentage point off gdp while the politicians do nothing and just try to score political points. >> isn't it pretty sad if we have a problem with debt, there are all kinds of ways to get there, you can cut, you can raise taxes but taking aside the debate on how you get there, the fact that we can't even deal with 2.5% of the budget is pretty sad. >> yeah. well, what's interesting here is that it is a very small percentage of the budget. it's actually been covered already by the reduction in projections of health care costs into the future. medicare and medicaid are actually going to cost us a lot less
of it is politics? how do we react to that? "outfront," daniel altman, economics professor at nyu, it political columnist for "newsweek" and "the daily beast." you listened to all this talk about all these dire implications, is it real or is it scare tactics? >> some of it is definitely real. if you look at the figures we're looking at maybe 70,000 kids getting kicked out of head start programs. we're looking at a $1.6 billion cut in funding for the national institutes of health which does research into life-saving medical procedures and drugs. it's going to be $1.1 trillion in cuts over a decade, we're looking at maybe 4% of the federal budget overall. that's serious. when you think about the unemployment rate, 7.9%, 92% of people are employed, cut out 4% of the federal budget, that's going to have a big effect on the economy. >> the transportation secretary ray lahood spoke at the white house briefing today. all of you listen to this. >> there has to be some impact in order to save $1 billion. $1 billion is a lot of money. >> let's be clear, it's less than 2% of your budget -- >> it's a lot o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 91 (some duplicates have been removed)